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US marks Martin Luther King speech

Source BBC News@ tienganhvui.com


Martin Luther King at the March on WashingtonCivil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr delivered his speech to some 250,000 protesters at the Lincoln Memorial on 28 August 1963


The US will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March for Jobs and Freedom, the civil rights rally at which Martin Luther King Jr made his historic "I have a dream" speech.


President Barack Obama is to mark the occasion in Washington DC with an address from the same spot.


Members of the King family and veterans of the march will also be present.


Mr Obama, the first black US president, has described the 1963 protest as a "seminal event" in American history.


The march was considered a catalyst for civil rights reforms in the US.


Dominant force

President Obama is due to deliver his address at the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall just after an organised ringing of bells by churches and other groups at 15:00 local time (19:00 GMT), to mark the exact time that Martin Luther King spoke on 28 August 1963.


Mr Obama will be joined by former Presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, as well as prominent African Americans.



Martin Luther King Jr 1929 - 1968


Dr King



  • Born in Atlanta, Georgia on 15 January 1929

  • Rose to national prominence after the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955

  • King gave his famous 'I have a dream' speech in Washington in 1963

  • In 1964 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

  • Gives strident anti-Vietnam war speech on 4 April 1967

  • Assassinated on 4 April 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee




On Saturday, thousands of people, including King's eldest son, marched to the Lincoln Memorial to mark the milestone anniversary.


Half a century earlier, Martin Luther King had led some 250,000 protesters down the same strip and delivered his famous speech from its steps.


"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character." he said, in one of the most celebrated pieces of American oratory.


His address marked the peak of a series of protests against racial discrimination that had begun when seamstress Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat for a white passenger in 1955.


Her action sparked a bus boycott campaign across Montgomery, Alabama.


King became a dominant force in the movement and so was called on to make the final speech at the march.


He advocated the use of non-violent tactics such as sit-ins and protest marches, and was awarded the Nobel peace prize in 1964.


Four years later, his assassination led to mass riots in more than 100 US cities.





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